Their crew arrived promptly at 7:00 am. Carlos explained what each crew member would be doing. They increased the insulation in my attic. They also discovered that the ducts had been attached to the vents with plain duct tape. The duct tape had become gooey due to heat and had slipped off the vents in many places. This allowed out side air and dust to enter, spreading dust out of the vents. It also allowed cooled air to escape into the attic. The corrected all of the duct work connections. Jeff came to check the work upon completion. He ran tests to verify that the work had been done correctly, and he replaced all of the "regular" light bulbs with cal bulbs. All of the work was done quickly and neatly.
How exactly do you expect to kill or remove mold without it ? You can’t even clean your hvac systems coils without moisture of some type ,if you use a steam cleaner you can literally clean the whole system minus the electronics . You should do more research and possibly talk to people who do the work before posting , but don’t listen to me i only have a class A contractor license ,epa license , install /repair hvacs , rent and flip houses for a living .
And if you have flex duct and/or fiberglass ductboard in your home- the last thing you want is a big brush or anything abrasive running through it. Even high-pressure air can erode ductboard so I wouldn’t clean it with anything. If it becomes contaminated, get rid of it and install real ductwork. If your ductwork is accessible in the basement – the best thing to do is take it down and manually clean it if it’s full of junk. It’s not going to cost a nickel more to do that than to pay $500-1000 for a ‘duct cleaning machine” AKA big blower and vacuum – to do the job.
I just had my Air ducts “cleaned”. The person who came to my house works for an air duct cleaning company who uses a professional vacuum. He said the company would charge me about $900 but he can do it aside on his own and charge me half of that. However, when he came over the house, he brought the rotary brush along with his domestic vacuum cleaner that it’s hose was about 5 feet long, I ask him that the wasnt strong enough to pull dust out, and he said, it’s similar to what companies use. I was in doubt and he didnt cover the vents so im thinking all dust must have come out from every air vents. Could this vacuum have taking the debris out of the air ducts? Or how can I myself find out if the inside of the air ducts have been cleaned and no debris is sitting there? I have dust all over my house.
After major damage to a small addition on our home was damaged in the windstorm in May, the insurer’s preferred vendor sanded drywall without taping off the area. They relied on heat from the furnace to dry the mudding compound. They claimed they shut the furnace off while sanding and regardless of whether they did or not, they never cleaned up the drywall dust before turning the furnace back on. I now have drywall dust everywhere and my husband took photos to verify our concerns. They even sanded right above a cold air return. Vents were never covered either. The same company that created this mess is cleaning my ducts today. They have refused to clean the furnace. Their are health concerns for my almost 85 yr old mother who resides with us. I’ve tried 3 times in the last 7 days to escalate to a manager and they will not return my call. They just keep sending it back down to my adjuster. There are many other issues we’ve encountered since May as well. This is a major insurance company who has the resources to fix this mess but refuse. Please help!

i called in and spoke to paula who said 6 weeks to get an appointment. i asked what cleaners they use to sanatize and deoderize. she said she was the only one there and didnt know. i explained i have severe allergies and she said someone would call me and let me know. they never called. brian came today and vaccumed my vents- and not all of them. i called and spoke to someone who said they were the manager named jennifer- she kept laughing at me and refused to let me talk to anyone else-she said she is the owner and would not give a refund.


I had them out to clean the ducts, exhaust fans, and dryer vent in my 54 year-old home yesterday.  They showed up a bit early and took their time to ensure that all the grunge was gone.  I must say...they really earned their paycheck with this place!  The father and son duo worked together to remove and clean the register covers, ream out the ducts and vents with a big furry brush/vacuum unit, and vacuum up the mess.  They stated that I had the dirtiest ducts they had encountered in 15 years, and took over two hours to tidy them up, finding nails, copper pipe and assorted detritus and emptying the vacuum bag three times in the process.  They were here over 2 1/2 hours, yet charged the fee they had quoted me on the phone, as promised.  It was not the cheapest price I have seen, but it  seemed fair to me.
Definitely would recommend. I just bought a house in the Hyde Park area. It is an older house, but I could tell just by looking at the vents that they had not been cleaned in years. I was having issues with my breathing, so I decided to have them cleaned. You have to schedule pretty far out in advance, but it is because they are very busy. They gave me a time window of 8-11 and showed up right in the middle of that window. I opted for the full cleaning and sanitizing because my vents were that bad. The two guys that cleaned my vents did a great job. He recorded the vents before and after and I could not believe the results. He also showed me what had been caught by my filter and sucked up by the vacuum. Would highly recommend to anyone purchasing a home to have this done.

You may consider having your air ducts cleaned simply because it seems logical that air ducts will get dirty over time and should be occasionally cleaned. Provided that the cleaning is done properly, no evidence suggests that such cleaning would be detrimental. EPA does not recommend that the air ducts be cleaned routinely, but only as needed. EPA does, however, recommend that if you have a fuel burning furnace, stove or fireplace, they be inspected for proper functioning and serviced before each heating season to protect against carbon monoxide poisoning.

×